Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy Reviews

| December 25, 2013 | 6 Comments

Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy

Delavier's Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy

From powerful blows to explosive kicks, Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy takes you inside the action and impact of one of the world’s most popular, grueling, and challenging sports. Over 230 full-color photos and 120 anatomical illustrations allow you to go inside more than 120 exercises specifically selected for the neuromuscular demands of the sport. You’ll see how muscles interact with surrounding joints and skeletal structures and how variations and sequencing can isolate specific muscles to enhance the full arsenal of combat skills. Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy features an anatomomorphological approach to allow you to choose the most effective exercises for your body type, physical conditioning, and fighting style. From boxing to ground fighting, you’ll enhance your strengths and minimize your weaknesses with more than 20 proven programs. Featuring the latest exercises for injury prevention and foam roller techniques for muscle regeneration, it

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  1. DapperDave says:
    15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Great primer for MMA conditioning., November 4, 2013
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy (Paperback)

    This is a really great book overall. It contains a wealth of information regarding how to condition your body for MMA. I truly wish I would have had this book nine years ago the first time I stepped on the mat. When I first started training mma, jujitsu, and combatives years ago I poured through tons and tons of books and magazine articles trying to figure out how to strength train for fighting. The beauty of this book is that the information is spot on, all in one location and is what you will hear from other respected fight conditioning coaches/specialists. The info and exercises are all pretty legit, and are employed by most fighters at some point in there training.

    This book is almost completely dedicated to strength, power and endurance training for MMA. There is a little bit of info regarding cardiovascular issues in MMA, but its really only a paragraph or two.

    I must say, this book probably has more to offer someone that is unfamiliar with MMA/fight sport conditioning. If you’ve been training for years and have tons of books on fight conditioning and training methods, you really won’t find anything new here. But if you’re just starting your MMA training, this book will save you tons of time by giving you most of the info that you need to know about how to set up your program, what exercises to pick, what muscle groups to focus on, and how to incorporate your conditioning into your fight training schedule. In fact, if you’re looking for a reasonably priced primer for fight conditioning, this is probably your best buy. Trust me, I’ve read a ton of them. This book gives you a lot of info without any fluff.

    A more experienced practitioner will thoroughly enjoy the excellent drawings and anatomical explanations used to describe why and how the suggested exercises work. For example even if you already have a working knowledge of what muscles are affected in say, an arm bar escape, its really cool to see those muscles highlighted in the drawings with an explanation of why a hammer curl and the isometric version of the hammer curl will help you work some of the muscles involved in an arm bar escape. Its nothing you won’t know already, but its still pretty awesome.

    Another really great feature of the book is that there are exercise suggestions based on the technique you want to improve. So, if you want to improve your punching power, there is a section devoted to doing so. If you want to increase your ability to pick someone up, or take a punch to the jaw, or throw a harder kick, or a shaper elbow, and a lot more, there are sections for all of those things as well. You get the exercise suggestions, an explanation of why the suggested exercise will improve the specified technique, and a really sweet drawing of the involved muscle groups and photos depicting how the exercise is performed. Absolutely fantastic!

    There are also several routines in the back of the book that are designed for different goals at all levels. There are beginner routines as well as advanced routines, and they range from power routines to endurance routines. Most of them are pretty decent.

    The book itself is very attractive. Its sort of got like a text book feel to it. But no where near as boring. There are tons of drawings and photos on every page, and they compliment the text instead of competing with it for your attention.

    There are some things that I wish would have been done differently, or that they will include in a second edition.

    First, like I said earlier, the information is pretty basic. Its rock solid, but its very basic. For example, they talk about the close grip bench press and how it works better for punching and pushing someone off of you than the traditional wide grip bench press due to the hand placement and the muscles used being pretty much the same. And thats great, and true, but why not add a few more exercises that are maybe a bit more advanced and maybe even more sport specific, like a doing close grip pushups on a medicine ball, which is very similar to a close grip press, and also known to increase punching power? JC Santana(look him up if you don’t know who he is, he’s a beast and does a ton of work with fighters) has used the exercise to prepare world class fighters, wrote and posted articles about it, and for some reason they don’t include it in the exercise list for increasing punching power. I don’t know if they intended the exercises to be basic, but I really wish they would have gone a bit more in depth with the exercise suggestions. That’s just a single example and its not a big deal if you’re new to all of this, but if you’re not, you’re going to see a lot of the same things you’ve seen before.

    The second thing I wasn’t crazy about and hope they change in the future is that a lot of the photos of the exercises are from some of Delavier’s other books and the models obviously aren’t fighters. This is a…

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  2. Benjamin Espen "With Both Hands" says:
    8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    A solid book, November 27, 2013
    By 
    Benjamin Espen “With Both Hands” (Flagstaff, AZ United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy (Paperback)

    I received this book for free as part of the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program.

    This is the second work by Delavier, and the third from the publisher, Human Kinetics, that I have received through Early Reviewers. This probably makes sense. I have been strength-training since I was thirteen, I studied taekwondo from fourteen through twenty-one, and I have been into CrossFit for almost five years. I suppose I am an ideal reviewer, although I see myself as an interested layman rather than an expert.

    Much of what I said about Strength Training Anatomy Workout II, The (The Strength Training Anatomy Workout) applies here: the pictures are the best part of the book, illustrating muscles in a realistic style much like the Bodyworlds exhibit. Overall, the book seems solid, and I would consider it useful if I needed to design my own strength and conditioning program. I even learned a few things reading this book, which muscles are recruited in which moves, and the physiology of relaxing during a strike for maximum acceleration.

    I was critical of Strength Training Anatomy Workout II, The (The Strength Training Anatomy Workout) because I felt that the book concentrated too heavily on hypertrophy. Seeing this book, I feel some of what I said is unfair. The other book is about bodybuilding, which has become the sport of building size and weight primarily, and strength only comes as a side-effect of those things. This book has specific recommendations for increasing strength, power, speed, and endurance, which are separate domains of fitness. This work is tailored to its subject, and I suppose the other books Delavier have written are also similarly tailored.

    I do still think it is prudent to investigate your options regarding workouts. Delavier has a definite point of view, and things he is cool towards may be the foundation of effective strength and conditioning programs. I’m skeptical of the things he says about squats, for example, but this is a subject of intense controversy. I don’t know anyone in the world of fitness who wants to cause injury, but there is plenty of disagreement about the best way to prevent it. This is a good book, and worth your time if you need basics on what exercises do what, and basic programs to get you started.

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  3. Benjamin says:
    10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Another Winner from Delavier, November 30, 2013
    By 
    Benjamin (Chicago, IL USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy (Paperback)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine Program (What’s this?)

    Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy is one among the Anatomy Series published by Human Kinetic, a publisher from Champaign, IL (USA). The most popular volumes of this series are, with no doubt, those written by Frédéric Delavier (more than 2 million copies sold). I have read Strength Training Anatomy, 3rd Edition, Delavier’s Core Training Anatomy, Stretching Anatomy-2nd Edition, and Strength Training Anatomy Workout, The, which I heavily use on a daily basis for my strength training. All these books in this series provide detailed, full-color anatomical illustrations of the muscles in action and step-by-step instructions that detail perfect technique and form for each pose, exercise, movement, stretch, and stroke.
    Delavier’s Mixed Martial Arts Anatomy is another volume written by Frédéric Delavier with Michael Gundill. It provides more than 120 exercises and 20 training programs for one of the world’s toughest sports. The book is divided in three parts: principles of strength training; strength training exercises for fighting; and specific training programs. The illustrations, as always, are absolutely right on spot. There are many tips and warnings to avoid injuries, and also pictures of actual athletes performing the routines. These books are totally fascinating and extremely well written to offer professional advice to the general public. I strongly recommend them, this one in particular if you are in Martial Arts, or want to develop stronger core muscles and explosiveness.

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  4. TLM says:
    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Mediocre, February 11, 2012
    By 
    TLM

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    The shin-pads are so-so, I wouldn’t recommend them, for a few dollars more you can get a hook and loop shin guard with better padding that wont slip. Save yourself some grief and spend 8 more dollars.

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  5. Carl says:
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Loose fitting and uncomfortable., March 18, 2012
    By 
    Carl

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I bought these shin guards for sparing in my MMA class. The first problem is that the product fits very loosely (Yes I did order the right size). Since the shin guard material itself is a very hard material, and because this products fit loosely, when you kick, you end up just kicking the material on the front of the shin. Suffice to say it is not very enjoyable. My other quarrel is with the bottom of this shin guard. Where the toes come through there is a very thick stitching and it is very annoying to walk on. It feels as if you are pressing your foot down on a rope the entire time.

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  6. Anna says:
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Terrible for sparring., October 2, 2012
    By 
    Anna

    I tried the ‘small/medium’ size, I don’t have skinny or super-long legs, and their fit is terrible. They are loose around most of the shin, especially the lower shins, which makes them slide around with any movement. The hole around the heel prevents you from pulling on the sock all the way and the hole for the toes is really tight and bends the pinky toe in.

    As well, the padding is ridiculously thin. They might be fine for bag work or for kickboxing where you tend to mostly kick pads, but not for sparring or practicing blocking kicks with a partner. I have a really big bruise on my shin from just one class and you have to constantly adjust them.

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